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Sunday, 7 February 2010

7 Render Tips

Glass rendering techniques,

Material,

Tip 1. Generally you want a nice bit of reflection to show that the glass panel is glass, usually I bump up the reflection to around 30-35%.

Tip 2. Generally you want also to see where the glass is, when you select clear glass as a material it can be difficult to see it in renders without doing Photoshop work to the glass. I usually pick blue glass setting as a base.

Tip 3. Because revit is so perfect in terms of measurement and objects touching each other, the revit engine can sometime read a whole number of panels that's front face is aligned as one single panel and not show up the joint lines, you need to force gaps if you want nicer renderings, to understand this, the best plan is to copy your model and play around with the copy, I generally add curtain wall mullions that are black paint, 1/4" or 1/2" wide and render it, after see the results I can determine if it is too much or too little. Below, render glass reads as one panel as there is no dark mullions


Lighting,
The lighting is usually the most important factor of a rendering,

Tip 4. I usually bump up my lights to 10 times the realistic value, this is because the revit light settings aren't completely setup correctly.


Tip 5. Any lights that are very close to glass panels should be turned down individually to avoid hot spotting, using the dimmer in the render dialogue box is the simplest method.


Tip 6. For external renderings it can be especially difficult to read glass planes if there are no lights turned on inside the building, it will look like dark black panels as oppose to glass (Picture 2, see top left), turn on some lights and bump them up 100 times to be visible with the external daytime render settings. Once the lights inside become visible you should put the on a medium setting to avoid hot spotting, reflection in external views is also quite important. See picture 3 for an example


Picture 2


Picture 3


Tip 7. Once you've mastered the external daytime render with lights turned on inside the building you can turn it into a night renders with one very simple step in Photoshop. Take the daytime rendering jpeg and cut the sky background out in Photoshop and replace it with a night time sky. Leave the building as it was (day time rendering), now you render looks like a night time shot. See (picture 4) below, this was a daytime rendering with the sky and foreground swapped out.


Picture 4

15 comments:

Nathaniel said...

These are amazing. As a student at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo (4th Year Architecture) I was doubting Revit render potential. Looking at your renders, however, you have renewed my faith. I like your tip about 30% reflectivity. I currently have mine at about 5-12% and it never looks realistic. I will have to send you some renders and get some feed back. Thanks.

Peter McCarthy said...

Hey Nathaiel,

Hope university is going well for you. feel free to send your renders to me and i can comment on them, my private email is revitdetail at gmail dot com. I have to spell it out to avoid email spam.

Thanks

Peter

mandana said...

hi peter im a girl from iran
3th year architecture

im learning from you so much
can you leave more tutorials about modeling in revit?
you are great
thanks kissssss

howe law said...

hi Peter, love your blog, and especially the detail in your renders. Was just wondering when you talk about bumping up the lights in revit 10 times the value what you actually mean by that? Thanks for the great tutorials btw.

Peter McCarthy said...

Howe,

In edit properties of light, edit type, down at the bottom there is a light 'Initial intensity' setting, change it to the value to around 4000w & 4000kmW. This will change all the lights of that type, move to your render perspective and change your render setting to external sun and artificial, now the 'Artifical lights' are available to be dimmed, 1=100% turned on 0=0% turned on, 0.5=50% turned on. i usually set them to about .6 or so.

To group lights so you know which ones to turn on and off in your view, go to your ceiling plan, select a light and you''ll see 'group' appear in the modify bar, select edit. you can now create groups, select ok to finish, now when you select your light you can select from the drop down list and put the lights into these groups. if you set a value for the group in the render dialouge it will give the same value to all the lights in the group.

Let me know if you need to know any more information.

Cheers

Peter

Peter McCarthy said...

Also stand by for my next 2 post (on rendering), i have a document to load up as well.

Pete

howe law said...

Cheers mate that really helped. I have another problem if you don't mind (I don't know anyone else who is as good at Revit lol), some of my light fixtures themselves aren't lighting up.

I can see the light distrubution, but the actual luminaire itself isn't glowing. This is an example of what I mean: http://img822.imageshack.us/img822/6383/procd.jpg

The white circles are the lights themselves which aren't glowing. Thanks again for your advice :)

Peter McCarthy said...

Its most likely that the start of the light ray is at the bottom of the geometry and aiming down thus not lighting the object above. you could try place a piece of glass near the bottom of the light(inside the steel.) and give the glass a material with self illuminance, it will appear to be lighting up the scene but infact it will just be lighting itself and using the light ray to light the scene, if you look at the interior image in this post the long linear light is done in this fassion.

Pete

howe law said...

That's awesome I will try it out. Though it's a bit wierd because I downloaded these lights and assumed the manufacturer would make them correctly. Anyways thanks very much for the tips :)

chiek.. said...

Hi Peter,

I don't like the sky(cloud) of my daytime rendering. How do I get it to look like the one you have up here?

Thanks

Peter McCarthy said...

Hey Chiek,

You need to do it in photoshop, if you export your image from revit as png file it removes the background enviroment, in photoshopdrop a sky image behind the main layer and it works out like the images inclosed, hope this helps.

Cheers

Peter

Anonymous said...

I think your post is brilliant, Now I am working off 2013... and the controlls are different, any undates or any recommedations on someone with a blog that address this?
Thanks
E

Anonymous said...

Awesome tutorials ! waiting for more to come up !!

Anonymous said...

Hi anyone there? :D
mmm, can i ask about how to make the vertical groove on the wall. horizontal is reveal wall, right?
how about the vertical? i have made by void but some problem occurs like "chain" problem thing occur. or do you have another technique in doing so. thanks a lot. >Vlad

btw thanks for the tutorial

Anonymous said...

Awesome tutorials ! waiting for more to come up !!